12 NIGHT BRITISH ISLES CRUISE ADVENTURE STARTS HERE

Amsterdam , Netherlands | Edinburgh (S. Queensferry) , Scotland | Inverness / Loch Ness , Scotland | Cork (Cobh) , Ireland | Dublin , Ireland | Dublin , Ireland | Holyhead , Wales | St. Peter Port , Guernsey | Dover , England | Amsterdam , Netherlands

YOUR SHIP

BRILLIANCE OF THE SEAS

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YOUR SHIP

BRILLIANCE OF THE SEAS

BRILLIANCE OF THE SEAS

TIME FOR A LATITUDE ADJUSTMENT

Calling all backroads ramblers and culture cruisers— your ship's come in. Whether you're catching a movie poolside or enjoying Tuscan dishes at Giovanni's Table, you're in for the ultimate adventure in between shores.

DAY 1 - Departure Day

Amsterdam, Netherlands

DEPARTS:
5:00 PM

DUTCH DISCOVERIES

Pick up syrupy stroopwafels from a street vendor for breakfast and then enjoy a peaceful walk through Dam Square, home to the Royal Palace. Trace the city’s unique history through artifacts and photos at the Amsterdam Museum. Or get hands-on with the kids at the NEMO Science Center.

The Amsterdam dancing houses over Amstel river in Amsterdam, Netherlands
Beautiful sunrise over Amsterdam, Netherlands, with flowers and bicycles on a bridge in spring
Aerial view of Amsterdam, Netherlands

Pick up syrupy stroopwafels from a street vendor for breakfast and then enjoy a peaceful walk through Dam Square, home to the Royal Palace. Trace the city’s unique history through artifacts and photos at the Amsterdam Museum. Or get hands-on with the kids at the NEMO Science Center.

The Amsterdam dancing houses over Amstel river in Amsterdam, Netherlands
Beautiful sunrise over Amsterdam, Netherlands, with flowers and bicycles on a bridge in spring
Aerial view of Amsterdam, Netherlands
Things To Do

in Amsterdan

Glass top boat ride along the canals of Amsterdam, Netherlands

CRUISING FOR A PERUSING

No visit to Amsterdam is complete without a boat ride along its picturesque maze of canals. Gain a unique perspective of the city’s UNESCO-listed Canal Ring district as you float under historic bridges and past gabled mansions— whether in a glass-topped tour boat or in your own rented pedal boat.

The Van Hogh museum

GOGH FOR THE ART

Enter the world-renowned Van Gogh Museum to explore the life and greatest works of the Dutch post-impressionist painter Vincent Van Gogh. Home to the world’s largest collection of paintings by the artist, this inspiring space houses many of his famous self-portraits and paintings, like The Potato Eaters and Sunflowers.

A statue of Anne Frank in Amsterdam, Netherlands

JOURNAL TO THE PAST

Relive the harrowing story of young Jewish teenager Anne Frank, whose diary entries during World War II became one of the best-selling books of all time. Step inside the annex where she lived in hiding with her family, viewing the converted museum exhibitions that detail their time in Amsterdam.

Stack of fresh Stroopwafels with honey and coffee, in a shop in Amsterdam, Netherlands

LOCAL CUISINE

Amsterdam delivers a mix of Michelin-rated restaurants, canal-side cafes, and quintessential “Brown Bar” pubs. Hit a street market for herring sandwiches, syrup-filled stroopwafels, or fries slathered with mayonnaise. You can’t go wrong with stamppot (veggie mashed potatoes) or bitterballen (fried meatballs). And if you’re thirsty, sip jenever (Dutch gin)— or taste beer at the Heineken Experience.

Tulips for sale at a flower market in Amsterdam, Netherlands

SHOPPING

De Bijenkorf is the city’s most famous department store since 1870. Daily open-air markets span the city, including the aromatic Flower Market. Browse jewelry shops and boutiques among The Nine Streets— or pick up cannabis-inspired goods in the Red Light District. Also be sure to take home the region’s legendary blue Delft pottery.

DAY 2 - AT SEA

CRUISING

CAN'T MISS FAVORITES

Family Enjoying a Round of Mini Golf
Girl Climbing the Rock Wall while Parents Watch

Family Enjoying a Round of Mini Golf
Girl Climbing the Rock Wall while Parents Watch

Things to Do

Man Climbing Down the Rock Wall
Rock Climbing Wall

A BOLDER BOULDER

Rise to the occasion and take on the signature Rock Climbing Wall. From beginners to speed climbers, everyone can enjoy an unparalleled view from 40 feet above deck. Included in your fare, no reservation required.

Family Playing Mini Golf on Liberty of the Seas
Mini Golf

ON PAR FOR ADVENTURE

Hit the links on the high seas! Refine your mini-golf game on a green that overlooks a sea of blue. Included in your fare, no reservation required.

DAY 3 - TENDERED

Edinburgh (S. Queensferry), Scotland

ARRIVES:
7:00 AM
DEPARTS:
6:00 PM
KING OF

CASTLE ROCK

Every Edinburgh excursion should begin in the Old Town. Explore the Royal Mile from Edinburgh Castle to Holyrood Palace. Top Old Town stops include colorful Victoria Street, St. Giles Cathedral and the National Museum of Scotland. For views, check out Calton Hill or Arthur's Seat. Walk down Princes Street in the New Town toward Princes Street Gardens, a picturesque spot for a midday picnic.

The Edinburgh Castle on Castle Rock in Edinburgh, Scotland
Aerial view of the old town in Edinburgh, Scotland
A river running through scenic Dean Village in Edinburgh, Scotland

Every Edinburgh excursion should begin in the Old Town. Explore the Royal Mile from Edinburgh Castle to Holyrood Palace. Top Old Town stops include colorful Victoria Street, St. Giles Cathedral and the National Museum of Scotland. For views, check out Calton Hill or Arthur's Seat. Walk down Princes Street in the New Town toward Princes Street Gardens, a picturesque spot for a midday picnic.

The Edinburgh Castle on Castle Rock in Edinburgh, Scotland
Aerial view of the old town in Edinburgh, Scotland
A river running through scenic Dean Village in Edinburgh, Scotland
Things To Do

in Edinburgh (S. Queensferry)

A close up view of the Edinburgh Castle in Scotland

Climb Castle Rock

Edinburgh Castle dominates the city's skyline from its position on Castle Rock. You can check out the free views outside. But there are many exciting paid exhibits inside, too, including the Crown Jewels, the Great Hall, the National War Museum and the Stone of Destiny.

Interior view of the National Museum of Scotland

Be a Wise Guy

Edinburgh is full of opportunities for learning. It's free to visit the National Museum of Scotland, with exhibits on everything from dinosaurs to medieval decorative art. The free Writers' Museum celebrates Sir Walter Scott, Robert Burns and Robert Louis Stevenson. For other educational stops, check out the Surgeons' Hall Museum and the Museum of Childhood.

Colorful buildings lining Victoria Street in Edinburgh, Scotland

Follow in Harry's Footsteps

Harry Potter fans will know all about Edinburgh's place in the creation of the much-loved books. Cruise to Edinburgh and head to the Elephant House and Spoon Cafes, where Rowling wrote parts of her first book. Greyfriars Kirkyard's gravestones inspired some of the characters' names, and colorful Victoria Street was the inspiration behind Diagon Alley. There's also the luxurious Rowling Suite at the Balmoral Hotel.

A plate of haggis, neeps and tatties in Scotland

Local Cuisine

Be brave and try Scotland's signature dish: haggis. It's a savory pudding of meat (sometimes liver and heart), oats, onions and spices — and yes, it's cooked inside a sheep's stomach, but it serves more as a sausage casing than anything else. Not feeling up for the experience? Try one of the city's many upscale farm-to-table eateries, where you'll find dishes like local lamb served along daikon radishes and woodruff, a wild herb.

A rack full of tartan cloth kilts in Edinburgh, Scotland

Shopping

Harry Potter fans need to visit Diagon House or Galaxy. You can also pick up a tartan or cashmere keepsake at one of the Royal Mile's many souvenir stores, including the House of Edinburgh. For unique jewelry, prints and gifts handmade by indie designers from the U.K. and abroad, visit Hannah Zakari during your cruise.

INSIDER TIP

Admire the views of Edinburgh Castle from Princes St Gardens, Calton Hill and Grassmarket.

DAY 4 - DOCKED

Inverness / Loch Ness, Scotland

ARRIVES:
8:00 AM
DEPARTS:
6:00 PM

WOAH, NESSIE!

The name of the port city of Inverness means "mouth of the River Ness," and the port is just 15 minutes away from Loch Ness itself. Combine a boat ride on the lake with tours of nearby castles — the ruins of Urquhart, perched a top a hill overlooking the Loch, are a must-see. Shakespeare fans should visit Cawdor Castle, home to Macbeth and one of the bard's most famous murder scenes.

The ruins of Urquhart Castle overlooking Loch Ness
City view of Inverness in Scotland
The Inverness Castle in Inverness, Scotland

The name of the port city of Inverness means "mouth of the River Ness," and the port is just 15 minutes away from Loch Ness itself. Combine a boat ride on the lake with tours of nearby castles — the ruins of Urquhart, perched a top a hill overlooking the Loch, are a must-see. Shakespeare fans should visit Cawdor Castle, home to Macbeth and one of the bard's most famous murder scenes.

The ruins of Urquhart Castle overlooking Loch Ness
City view of Inverness in Scotland
The Inverness Castle in Inverness, Scotland
Things To Do

in Inverness / Loch Ness

Yellow flowers blooming on the shore of Loch Ness in Scotland

Search for a Sea Monster

Cruise Scotland's famous lake, Loch Ness, with camera at the ready to see if its legendary monster, Nessie, will finally make a definitive appearance. Or cast your eyes wide over the lake from the ruins of Urquhart Castle.

View of Dunrobin Castle from a garden

Castles and Shakespeare

The Scottish Highlands have several castles to explore. Dunrobin Castle has a museum, a falconry and gardens inspired by those at France's Palace of Versailles. Check out Cawdor Castle's tower and legendary thorn tree, where Shakespeare set one of the (many) murder scenes from "Macbeth."

Four glasses of malt Scotch

A Wee Dram

No trip to Scotland would be complete without sampling some fine single-malt Scotch whisky, with its distinctive smoky, peaty quality. There's no "e" in the Scottish spelling; "whiskey" is for the Irish and American versions. Learn about the whisky-making process at the award-winning distillery Glenmorangie.

A bowl of Cullen Skink fish soup in Scotland

Local Cuisine

Fans of Boston clam chowder should try cullen skink, a similarly rich fish soup made with potatoes and smoked haddock. For dessert, cranachan is the Scottish version of parfait, with raspberries, cream, toasted oatmeal — and a little Scotch whisky, of course. As you wander the streets of Inverness, the scents wafting from the local chippy will make it hard to pass by without ordering some fish and chips.

Various kilts for sale in Scotland

Shopping

Scottish sweets like shortbread, toffees, caramels and Edinburgh rock make an ideal gift — if you can prevent yourself from eating them before you get home. Cruise to Loch Ness and pick up a bottle of the favorite single-malt you sample from one of the local distilleries. You'll find many products made in tartan patterns, a type of plaid associated with specific Scottish clans.

INSIDER TIP

Scots take pride in being Scottish. Remember, Scotland is distinct from England, though both are part of the U.K.

DAY 5 - AT SEA

CRUISING

FOR FOODIES

Salmon Salad bowl with Watercress served at Izumi, a fine dining Japanese Restaurant. One of our best vacation cruise dining.
Sushi chef prepping a sushi plate at Izumi Japanese fine dining restaurant. One of the best vacation cruise dining.

Salmon Salad bowl with Watercress served at Izumi, a fine dining Japanese Restaurant. One of our best vacation cruise dining.
Sushi chef prepping a sushi plate at Izumi Japanese fine dining restaurant. One of the best vacation cruise dining.

Things to Do

Assorted Sushi Rolls Platter served at Izumi, Japanese Restaurant. One of the best fine dining cuisine on a cruise.
Izumi

A FAR EAST FEAST

Say “Konnichiwa” to a reimagined favorite. Sushi, sashimi and more, all made-to-order with intense flavors, the best ingredients and impeccable presentation. Now that’s fresh.

Lobster & Alaska king crab main entree, served at the Elegant Chefs Table restaurant. One of the best cruise line fine dining
Chef's Table

AS VIP AS CAN BE

Located in an intimate, exclusive spot onboard, this private epicurean experience for a limited number of guests, treats you to a five-course, menu and wine tasting.

DAY 6 - DOCKED

Cork (Cobh), Ireland

ARRIVES:
8:00 AM
DEPARTS:
6:00 PM

IRELAND'S CULTURAL CAPITAL

Spend a few hours in Cobh visiting the Titanic Experience and taking the walking tour of the city, the Titanic Trail. Then, catch the next train — you'll be in Cork in less than 30 minutes. Check out the 360-degree views from St. Anne's Church. Then, indulge your senses at the English Market; crack the crust on a loaf of fresh bread, and sample distinctive artisanal cheeses.

Holy Trinity Church in Cork, Ireland
The Castle of Blarney in Cork, Ireland
Colorful waterfront buildings in Cork, Ireland

Spend a few hours in Cobh visiting the Titanic Experience and taking the walking tour of the city, the Titanic Trail. Then, catch the next train — you'll be in Cork in less than 30 minutes. Check out the 360-degree views from St. Anne's Church. Then, indulge your senses at the English Market; crack the crust on a loaf of fresh bread, and sample distinctive artisanal cheeses.

Holy Trinity Church in Cork, Ireland
The Castle of Blarney in Cork, Ireland
Colorful waterfront buildings in Cork, Ireland
Things To Do

in Cork (Cobh)

The Blarney house in Cork, Ireland

Kiss the Blarney Stone

Don't leave the region without getting up close and personal with the Blarney Stone at Blarney Castle, located eight kilometers northwest of Cork. Legend has it, if you literally bend over backwards to kiss the stone, you'll gain the gift of eloquence.

The gaol in Cork's old city

Go to Gaol

Going to prison is usually a bad thing, but Cork City Gaol (the Celtic spelling for "jail") is the exception. The castle-like building once housed 19th century prisoners. It closed in 1923 to become a broadcasting station and reopened as a museum in 1993. Today, you can tour the cells and see the artifacts of early radio broadcasting.

A building at Fort Mitchel on Spike Island in Ireland

Fortify Yourself

Take the short, scenic ferry ride from Cobh to Spike Island — named the top European tourist attraction at the 2017 World Travel Awards — and explore Fort Mitchel. Over 200 years old, the star-shaped fortress previously held 2,300 prisoners. For brave souls, the island even offers After Dark tours.

A serving of traditional stew with a pint of beer on the side

Local Cuisine

Visit the local artisans selling their fresh produce at English Market in Cork, where trading has been happening since 1788. You'll find artisan cheese and bread, locally raised meats, fresh produce and seafood. Then, head to a traditional restaurant on Oliver Plunkett street for a classic dinner of fish and chips or lamb stew with potatoes and vegetables.

Various souvenir Irish magnets

Shopping

St. Patrick's Street in the city center is Cork's main shopping district to see with your Ireland cruise. You'll find modern pop-ups like Wild Design, which offers ethically made handicrafts and jewelry. Traditional Irish stores like Kilkenny Shop specialize in everything from pottery to home decor. The common theme here is high-quality, Irish-made goods.

INSIDER TIP

In Cobh, walk up West View — one of Ireland's steepest hills — to photograph St. Colman's Cathedral backdropping the rainbow houses.

DAY 7 - DOCKED

Dublin, Ireland

ARRIVES:
2:00 PM
DUBLIN UP

ON THE THRILLS

Begin your day with a history lesson at one of the city's many historic sights. Check out Dublin Castle, originally a medieval fortress built on the site of a Viking settlement. See Kilmainham Gaol, which was built in 1796 and held many of the most prominent figures from Ireland's fight for independence. Then do as the Irish do and have a drink — Dublin is home to both the Guinness Storehouse and Jameson Distillery.

View of the Trong Tower of the Dublin Castle in Dublin, Ireland
The Baily Lighthouse on Howth Head in Ireland
The Christ Church Cathedral in Dublin, Ireland

Begin your day with a history lesson at one of the city's many historic sights. Check out Dublin Castle, originally a medieval fortress built on the site of a Viking settlement. See Kilmainham Gaol, which was built in 1796 and held many of the most prominent figures from Ireland's fight for independence. Then do as the Irish do and have a drink — Dublin is home to both the Guinness Storehouse and Jameson Distillery.

View of the Trong Tower of the Dublin Castle in Dublin, Ireland
The Baily Lighthouse on Howth Head in Ireland
The Christ Church Cathedral in Dublin, Ireland
Things To Do

in Dublin

A glass filled with a dark Irish stout beer

A Proper Pint

Ireland's No. 1 tourist attraction is the Guinness Storehouse. With seven floors of interactive experiences, the end reward is a perfectly poured pint at the world-famous Gravity Bar. If beer isn't your thing, visit the Jameson Distillery for a 40-minute tasting tour of Ireland's best-selling Irish whiskey.

Frontal view of the Malahide Castle in Dublin, Ireland

Toast the Past

Dublin has a long history, beginning with the Viking raids in the 9th and 10th centuries. Explore the city's past at attractions like Malahide Castle, which dates back to the 1100s and houses a complex walled garden. Check out St Patrick's Cathedral, another 12th century built in dramatic Gothic style.

A fallow deer in Phoenix Park in Dublin, Ireland

Play in a Park

Dublin has many open green spaces. Phoenix Park, which is the largest enclosed public park in any European capital city. It's home to a herd of fallow deer, Dublin Zoo, gardens and Ashtown Castle. St Stephen's Green is another option, as is the National Botanic Gardens.

A typical Irish breakfast on a white plate

Local Cuisine

There are almost too many choices for dining in Dublin, from Michelin-starred restaurant to character-filled pubs. To fuel up for you adventure, take down a plate of beans in spiced tomato sauce with toast, topped with a fried egg — the dish is often paired with black pudding, a traditional type of blood sausage.

A clover leaf pendant souvenir from

Shopping

Dublin's two main shopping streets are O'Connell and Grafton Streets. For a unique souvenir, visit Avoca for clothes, accessories, wool blankets and home wares. The Ireland-only store still uses the wool mill where it all began in the 1700s. The Irish Design Shop also stocks home wares, jewelry and gifts.

INSIDER TIP

Dublin is famous for its colorful Georgian doors, which can be found around Fitzwilliam and Merrion Squares.

DAY 8 - DOCKED

Dublin, Ireland

DEPARTS:
11:55 PM
DUBLIN UP

ON THE THRILLS

Begin your day with a history lesson at one of the city's many historic sights. Check out Dublin Castle, originally a medieval fortress built on the site of a Viking settlement. See Kilmainham Gaol, which was built in 1796 and held many of the most prominent figures from Ireland's fight for independence. Then do as the Irish do and have a drink — Dublin is home to both the Guinness Storehouse and Jameson Distillery.

View of the Trong Tower of the Dublin Castle in Dublin, Ireland
The Baily Lighthouse on Howth Head in Ireland
The Christ Church Cathedral in Dublin, Ireland

Begin your day with a history lesson at one of the city's many historic sights. Check out Dublin Castle, originally a medieval fortress built on the site of a Viking settlement. See Kilmainham Gaol, which was built in 1796 and held many of the most prominent figures from Ireland's fight for independence. Then do as the Irish do and have a drink — Dublin is home to both the Guinness Storehouse and Jameson Distillery.

View of the Trong Tower of the Dublin Castle in Dublin, Ireland
The Baily Lighthouse on Howth Head in Ireland
The Christ Church Cathedral in Dublin, Ireland
Things To Do

in Dublin

A glass filled with a dark Irish stout beer

A Proper Pint

Ireland's No. 1 tourist attraction is the Guinness Storehouse. With seven floors of interactive experiences, the end reward is a perfectly poured pint at the world-famous Gravity Bar. If beer isn't your thing, visit the Jameson Distillery for a 40-minute tasting tour of Ireland's best-selling Irish whiskey.

Frontal view of the Malahide Castle in Dublin, Ireland

Toast the Past

Dublin has a long history, beginning with the Viking raids in the 9th and 10th centuries. Explore the city's past at attractions like Malahide Castle, which dates back to the 1100s and houses a complex walled garden. Check out St Patrick's Cathedral, another 12th century built in dramatic Gothic style.

A fallow deer in Phoenix Park in Dublin, Ireland

Play in a Park

Dublin has many open green spaces. Phoenix Park, which is the largest enclosed public park in any European capital city. It's home to a herd of fallow deer, Dublin Zoo, gardens and Ashtown Castle. St Stephen's Green is another option, as is the National Botanic Gardens.

A typical Irish breakfast on a white plate

Local Cuisine

There are almost too many choices for dining in Dublin, from Michelin-starred restaurant to character-filled pubs. To fuel up for you adventure, take down a plate of beans in spiced tomato sauce with toast, topped with a fried egg — the dish is often paired with black pudding, a traditional type of blood sausage.

A clover leaf pendant souvenir from

Shopping

Dublin's two main shopping streets are O'Connell and Grafton Streets. For a unique souvenir, visit Avoca for clothes, accessories, wool blankets and home wares. The Ireland-only store still uses the wool mill where it all began in the 1700s. The Irish Design Shop also stocks home wares, jewelry and gifts.

INSIDER TIP

Dublin is famous for its colorful Georgian doors, which can be found around Fitzwilliam and Merrion Squares.

DAY 9 - DOCKED

Holyhead, Wales

ARRIVES:
7:00 AM
DEPARTS:
6:00 PM

HISTORY AND ADVENTURE COLLIDE

Looking to pack in adventure? Immerse yourself in this ancient Welsh city. Walk the Anglesey Coastal Path, taking in jaw-dropping views of the seaside cliffs and brackish waters as you make your way to the lighthouse on South Stack island. Or stroll through the city center, tour Saint Cybi's Church and walk among the remants of Roman ramparts.

Coastal cliffs at South Stack in Wales
The St. Cybi church in Holyhead, Wales
A path surrounded by rocky landscape in Wales

Looking to pack in adventure? Immerse yourself in this ancient Welsh city. Walk the Anglesey Coastal Path, taking in jaw-dropping views of the seaside cliffs and brackish waters as you make your way to the lighthouse on South Stack island. Or stroll through the city center, tour Saint Cybi's Church and walk among the remants of Roman ramparts.

Coastal cliffs at South Stack in Wales
The St. Cybi church in Holyhead, Wales
A path surrounded by rocky landscape in Wales
Things To Do

in Holyhead

A stone hut at Breakwater Park in Holyhead, Wales

Throw It (Way, Way) Back

Immerse yourself in all things historic and prehistoric in Holyhead. After you've seen the Roman-era fort walls and the church dating back to 550 AD, head to even more ancient sites — there's a neolithic burial chamber at Trefignath, a mile and half outside town, and a group of Bronze-Age huts on the south slope of Holyhead Mountain.

The view of Holyhead and the harbor from the top of Holyhead mountain

Park It

Holyhead Breakwater Country Park has something for everyone. Check out the wildlife and industrial exhibitions, then explore the Rocky Coast and the lake Llyn Llwynog. The park offers access to both South Stack island and Holyhead Mountain, and walks here are perfect for families.

The South Stack Lighthouse in Wales

Get On Island Time

South Stack is an island located off the Holy Island coast. It's famous for its lighthouse, which you can visit by crossing a footbridge. South Stack's cliffs support large colonies of seabirds — catch a glimpse of the puffins from Ellin's Tower with your Irish Sea cruise.

Four welsh griddle cakes on a blue and white plate

Local Cuisine

Holyhead's dining scene is impressively eclectic. Head to Wavecrest Cafe for traditional Welsh griddle cakes, and hit up the Harbourfront Bistro for modern British cuisine, with lots of local seafood and slow-cooked lamb and beef. Interested in Indian cuisine? Locals love Nuha Tandoori.

Miniature traditional homes souvenirs

Shopping

Head to the streets lining the Old Harbour or take the drive to nearby Anglesey to find independent boutiques stocked with unique souvenirs and giftware. Seek out distinctive finds at vintage furniture stores. Pick up locally made decorations for your home or kitchen as many cruise ship visitors do. There's even a traditional watch and clock shop if you're looking to upgrade your timepiece.

INSIDER TIP

Driving is the best way to reach South Stack and Holyhead Golf Club.

DAY 10 - AT SEA

CRUISING

SUN DRENCHED DAYS

Family Swimming and Enjoying the Pool
Sunset at the Solarium Pool

Family Swimming and Enjoying the Pool
Sunset at the Solarium Pool

Things to Do

Girls Diving and Swimming in the Covered Pool
Pools

SWIM IT TO WIN IT

Soak up the sun or savor the shade on expanded pool decks, with complimentary loungers, live music, and the opportunity to enjoy a frosty cocktail.

Guests Enjoying the Drinks and Pool at the Solarium
Solarium

SUN AND SERENITY

Slip away to this adults-only indoor and outdoor retreat. The Solarium is your slice of paradise, with soothing whirlpools, warm sunshine and a refreshing water mist.

DAY 11 - TENDERED

St. Peter Port, Guernsey

ARRIVES:
7:00 AM
DEPARTS:
5:00 PM
CHANNEL THE

OLD-WORLD SPIRIT

Guernsey's capital, St. Peter Port offers visitors over 800 years of history and culture to explore. Roam the cobbled lanes of Cornet Street. Then, head to iconic Castle Cornet, where you can see historic armaments, wander formal gardens and take in the best views of the bay. Then, head to the Guernsey Tapestry Gallery to see the Millennium Tapestry — each of its 10 panels covers one century of the Channel Islands' history.

View of the Saint Peter Port harbor in the Channel Islands
City view of  Saint Peter Port and a church in the Channel Islands
Boats docked at a harbor in Saint Peter Port, Channel islands

Guernsey's capital, St. Peter Port offers visitors over 800 years of history and culture to explore. Roam the cobbled lanes of Cornet Street. Then, head to iconic Castle Cornet, where you can see historic armaments, wander formal gardens and take in the best views of the bay. Then, head to the Guernsey Tapestry Gallery to see the Millennium Tapestry — each of its 10 panels covers one century of the Channel Islands' history.

View of the Saint Peter Port harbor in the Channel Islands
City view of  Saint Peter Port and a church in the Channel Islands
Boats docked at a harbor in Saint Peter Port, Channel islands
Things To Do

in St. Peter Port

The interior of Castle Cornet in Saint Peter Port, Channel Islands

Scale the Castle

The royal fortress of Castle Cornet has kept the town and harbor of St. Peter Port safe for eight centuries. Explore the historic battlements, and enjoy breath-taking views towards the other islands. Then, wander the four formal gardens recreated in period styles from 17th to 19th centuries.

The Island Archives building in Saint Peter Port, Channel Islands

Literature Meets Architecture

Walk the halls of the Hauteville House, which was once home to the 19th-century French writer Victor Hugo. From the third-floor lookout, you can see panoramic views of the channel and the architecture of St. Peter Port. The Guernsey Island Archives, one of St. Peter Ports's most distinctive buildings, is right next door.

The Victorian Candie Gardens flowers in Saint Peter Port, Channel Islands

Sweet as Candie

Stroll the charming cobblestone streets of St. Peter Port's old town up to Candie Gardens. Once the formal gardens of a private home, they're now open for the public to enjoy. The tearoom has lovely views over the town and across to neighbouring islands. You'll also find the Guernsey Museum and Art Gallery here.

A crab cake sandwich with a side of french fries and cole slaw

Local Cuisine

St. Peter Port's location in the Channel Islands makes it the perfect place to taste both British and French food. Enjoy a fresh crab sandwich from one of the many beach side stalls, or stop into a chip shop for classic British fish and chips. Head to an upscale restaurant on the pier for higher-end fare like roasted sea bass with lime and ginger or pan-fried brill filet with lemon butter.

Antique copper cans

Shopping

Head to the Old Quarter for your share of antique shops and locally crafted goods, including traditional copper milk cans and sweaters made from much-loved Guernsey wool. With many family-run business, no two shops are alike. Or check out High Street, lined with small boutiques, gift shops and larger, well-known stores.

INSIDER TIP

If you visit in October or November, you'll end up eating cheaper because of the Tennerfest, a popular food festival, where restaurants put out set menus.

DAY 12 - DOCKED

Dover, England

ARRIVES:
6:45 AM
DEPARTS:
4:00 PM

CELTIC CLIFFHANGER

Discover Dover's history in a day. Start at the National Trust's White Cliffs of Dover Visitor Centre. Then head west to Dover Castle and its historic Secret Wartime Tunnels. Continuing west will take you into Dover's town center, which is home to Pencester Gardens and Dover Museum. The day's final stop is Western Heights of Dover, a 1800s hilltop fortification.

View of the white cliffs of Dover
Exterior view of Dover Castle in Dover, England
St. Mary Castro church in Dover, England

Discover Dover's history in a day. Start at the National Trust's White Cliffs of Dover Visitor Centre. Then head west to Dover Castle and its historic Secret Wartime Tunnels. Continuing west will take you into Dover's town center, which is home to Pencester Gardens and Dover Museum. The day's final stop is Western Heights of Dover, a 1800s hilltop fortification.

View of the white cliffs of Dover
Exterior view of Dover Castle in Dover, England
St. Mary Castro church in Dover, England
Things To Do

in Dover

Aerial view of the white cliffs of Dover, England

Walk the White Cliffs

The chalk composition of the White Cliffs of Dover gives them their stunning natural appearance. Walk along the cliff top to soak in the views of the busy English Channel and French coast. Or carry a book in your back pocket and wander aimlessly through a field of green.

Aerial view of Dover Castle in Dover, England

Castle Crawl

Dover Castle dates back to the 11th century. Its Great Tower is fantastically furnished to resemble a medieval court — performers included. The castle is also home to the Secret Wartime Tunnels. Built during Napoleonic times, the tunnels were used until the end of WWII, where you can now find exhibits inside tracing their history.

An assortment of five different bronze age tools

Museum Medley

Dover Museum is free, with exhibitions on Dover's history from the Stone Age to the Saxons and the town's growth since medieval times. Then, there's the award-winning Bronze Age Boat Gallery, which is home to the world's oldest known seagoing boat. The Dover Museum Shop is also stocked with souvenirs such as postcards and figurines.

Grilled shrimp on a black board

Local Cuisine

Dover's dining options range from traditional, no-frills eateries to hip urban bistros. Naturally, seafood is a specialty — try shell-on local king prawns or whitebait, lightly battered and fried golden-brown. Cruise to Dover, England and head to a pub for English fish pie, with smoked cod, haddock or halibut in bechamel sauce with mashed potatoes, covered in flaky puff pastry.

Assorted porcelain china cups and plates

Shopping

The Vintage Bubble, located inside The Wrong End of Town, is Dover's only handmade and personalized gift shop. It stocks gifts for everyone (including pets), with handmade home furnishings and an extensive collection of wooden toy boxes. Head to Pebbles Kiosk for Dover souvenirs or De Bradelei Wharf for an outlet shopping center during your England cruise.

INSIDER TIP

Remember to bring extra layers year-round if walking along the White Cliffs of Dover.

DAY 13 - Arrival Day

Amsterdam, Netherlands

ARRIVES:
6:00 AM

DOUBLE DUTCH ADVENTURE

Spend the afternoon in Amsterdam exploring the UNESCO-listed Canal Ring area, either by bicycle or boat. Stop by the Anne Frank House and see her wartime diaries. Check out Holland’s legendary windmills while learning about its reclaimed land. Or view mind-bending modern art at Stedelijk Museum. Top off the day with cocktails in a Red Light District watering hole.

Traditional old buildings and tulips in Amsterdam, Netherlands
Sunset shot of bridges over canals during Autumn in Amsterdam, Netherlands
The Royal Palace in Amsterdam, Netherlands

Spend the afternoon in Amsterdam exploring the UNESCO-listed Canal Ring area, either by bicycle or boat. Stop by the Anne Frank House and see her wartime diaries. Check out Holland’s legendary windmills while learning about its reclaimed land. Or view mind-bending modern art at Stedelijk Museum. Top off the day with cocktails in a Red Light District watering hole.

Traditional old buildings and tulips in Amsterdam, Netherlands
Sunset shot of bridges over canals during Autumn in Amsterdam, Netherlands
The Royal Palace in Amsterdam, Netherlands
Things To Do

in Amsterdan

Glass top boat ride along the canals of Amsterdam, Netherlands

CRUISING FOR A PERUSING

No visit to Amsterdam is complete without a boat ride along its picturesque maze of canals. Gain a unique perspective of the city’s UNESCO-listed Canal Ring district as you float under historic bridges and past gabled mansions— whether in a glass-topped tour boat or in your own rented pedal boat.

The Van Hogh museum

GOGH FOR THE ART

Enter the world-renowned Van Gogh Museum to explore the life and greatest works of the Dutch post-impressionist painter Vincent Van Gogh. Home to the world’s largest collection of paintings by the artist, this inspiring space houses many of his famous self-portraits and paintings, like The Potato Eaters and Sunflowers.

A statue of Anne Frank in Amsterdam, Netherlands

JOURNAL TO THE PAST

Relive the harrowing story of young Jewish teenager Anne Frank, whose diary entries during World War II became one of the best-selling books of all time. Step inside the annex where she lived in hiding with her family, viewing the converted museum exhibitions that detail their time in Amsterdam.

Stack of fresh Stroopwafels with honey and coffee, in a shop in Amsterdam, Netherlands

LOCAL CUISINE

Amsterdam delivers a mix of Michelin-rated restaurants, canal-side cafes, and quintessential “Brown Bar” pubs. Hit a street market for herring sandwiches, syrup-filled stroopwafels, or fries slathered with mayonnaise. You can’t go wrong with stamppot (veggie mashed potatoes) or bitterballen (fried meatballs). And if you’re thirsty, sip jenever (Dutch gin)— or taste beer at the Heineken Experience.

Tulips for sale at a flower market in Amsterdam, Netherlands

SHOPPING

De Bijenkorf is the city’s most famous department store since 1870. Daily open-air markets span the city, including the aromatic Flower Market. Browse jewelry shops and boutiques among The Nine Streets— or pick up cannabis-inspired goods in the Red Light District. Also be sure to take home the region’s legendary blue Delft pottery.

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